Mailing address: P.O. Box 6, Temecula, CA 92593  ~  Physical Address: 36701 Highway 79 South, Temecula, CA 92592
(951) 302-3837 ~ www.dorlandartscolony.org ~ info@dorlandartscolony.org
A California 501(c)(3) nonprofit organization

Suzanne Boyle McCrory - Writer

Steven Forry - Writer

Christoph Sturm - Musician

Jim Schlett - Photographer

Phyllis Mauldin - Visual Artist

Edan Lepucki - Writer

Kristen Daniels - Writer

Renie Oxley - Writer

Monica J. Brown is an interdisciplinary artist exploring the intersections between visual art sound, movement, poetry, prose and performance. Her visual art has been exhibited widely throughout Chicago, including ARC Gallery, the DuSable Museum, and the Museum of Science and Industry. She has also exhibited nationally and internationally including Juijiang University in China. She received a BFA from Otis College of Art and Design in Los Angeles; and an MA from Columbia College Chicago. Monica has participated in performances at the Museum of Contemporary Art, Chicago; and presented her solo performance Branch & Bough at Prop Theatre in Chicago and the Columbus Performing Arts Center in Ohio.

Winnie Swalley, founder of Mission Jazz, is a polymath educator, musician, screenwriter, and production, interface and interior designer who studied her curiosities at Columbia University, UCSB, UCLA, LA Film School and a decade in the private vocal arts studio of the great Mrs. Elizabeth Mannion. She enjoyed a short career as a concert singer, but preferred a quiet life where she could teach, raise children and build a large range of other artistic projects.  She has designed mobile apps, written screenplays, and produced, designed and directed short films and documentaries.

Barbara DeMarco-Barrett is founder and host of "Writers on Writing," which airs every Wednesday morning at 9 a.m. PT on KUCI-FM. She's author of the Los Angeles Times bestseller Pen on Fire: A Busy Woman's Guide to Igniting the Writer Within (Harcourt) and has stories in Orange County Noir and USA Noir: Best of the Akashic Noir Series. She's also written essays and articles for the Los Angeles Times, Poets & Writers, The Writer, Writers' Digest, The Authors Guild Bulletin, Orange Coast magazine and more. She teaches an online class for Gotham Writers Workshop, and two private workshops in Southern California where she lives with her husband and son, both musicians, and 13 typewriters, and counting.  

Jaimee Wriston Colbert is the author of three novels and three story collections: Vanishing Acts, Wild Things, Shark Girls, Dream Lives of Butterflies, Climbing the God Tree and Sex, Salvation, and the Automobile. Her work has won the CNY 2017 Book Award in Fiction, Willa Cather Fiction Prize, Ian MacMillan Fiction Prize, IPPY Gold Medal, Isotope Fiction Prize, and the Jane’s Story Prize. She is Professor of Creative Writing at SUNY, Binghamton University.

Jen Bergmark's short fiction has appeared in Bellevue Literary Review, Indiana Review, Puerto del Sol, Harpur Palate, The Drum, Cream City Review and other journals, and in the anthology New California Writing (Heyday Books). She received the John Gardner Memorial Prize in Fiction, the Goldenberg Prize for fiction (honorable mention), and was a finalist in Poets and Writers Magazine California Exchange Award competition. She was a featured artist in the New Short Fiction Series, a Los Angeles spoken word series in its 19th season, and she’s been a resident at Kimmel Harding Nelson Center for the Arts and Dorland Mountain Arts Colony. She holds an MFA from Bennington College and lives in Los Angeles. She’s currently working on a novel. 


Denise Howard Long’s short fiction has appeared in Smokelong Quarterly, Pithead Chapel, The Evansville Review, Blue Monday Review, and elsewhere. Her short story "Recuerdos Olvidados" was runner-up for the Larry Brown Short Story Award, and her story "Where It's Buried" won Five on the Fifth's Annual Short Story Contest. Denise is working on her first novel and lives in Nebraska, with her husband and two sons. 

Tammy Harris is an artist at heart, only lacking a few credits towards an art major in addition to her masters in special education. She is a prolific writer, artist, and photographer. Her passion for using her expertise to help others led her to create a thriving blog called TammysTeachings.com. Tammy will use this plethora of writing as a stepping stone towards her dream of authoring a book that will serve as a resource for parents and teachers throughout their journey of raising successful children.

Johanna Tarkkanen is a Finnish artist, composer, pianist and kantele player from Helsinki. Her music evolves from a deep connection with nature and old Finnish folk tradition. She is currently working on ecofeminin music, ecomusicology, overtones, live piano concerts, and film music.

Photo by Hanne Larsen.

Composer Dale Trumbore has been called “a rising star among modern choral composers” (AXS), and her works have been praised for their “soaring melodies and beguiling harmonies” (The New York Times). Trumbore's music has been commissioned and performed by organizations including the Los Angeles Master Chorale, Los Angeles Children's Chorus, Northwest Symphony Orchestra, Pasadena Symphony, and The Singers – Minnesota Choral Artists, among many others. Recently, Choral Arts Initiative released How to Go On, an album devoted entirely to Trumbore's choral works, which was a #4-bestselling Classical album on iTunes. Trumbore's compositions are available from Boosey & Hawkes, G. Schirmer, and MusicSpoke. Hear her music at daletrumbore.com

Nathan Rivera is a native of the Writing words and music on the accordion, guitar, voice, piano, what else? Traveling to share the gift of music with those willing to accept it. Spreading positivity and joy one note at a time. 

Tony Eprile is a South African writer now living in Vermont in the United States. He is the author of Temporary Sojourner and Other South African Stories (1989), which was a New York Times Notable Book of the Year, and The Persistence of Memory (2004), which won the Koret Jewish Book Award, was a New York Times Notable Book of the Year, and was listed as a best book of 2004 by the Washington Post and the Los Angeles Times. He has taught at Northwestern University, Williams College, Bennington College, Lesley University, and the Iowa Writers' Workshop

Douglas DeChow is the co-author of Generation Space: A Love Story and The Craft of Librarian Instruction and the co-editor of Intertwingled: The Life and Influence of Ted Nelson. His writing has appeared at The Atlantic, Scientific American, The Post Game, Fifth Wednesday Journal, Curator, and others. He is the Digital Humanities and Science Librarian at Chapman University, the Curator of the Boisjoly Challenger Disaster Collection, and actively involved in the Center for American War Letters. 

Angela Cybulski is a writer, editor, and teacher who lives in Southern California. She is currently  the Managing Editor for Wiseblood Books, a small literary press specializing in works of fiction, criticism, and non-fiction that seeks to find its aesthetic bearings in the great literary tradition of the mid-twentieth century. Angela teaches English and creative writing and is also an experienced literacy and special needs consultant/advocate. She is helping to develop the fine arts program at St. Michael’s Preparatory School and will teach drama there next year. Her writing appears on the blogs Persephone Writes, one tiny violet, Dappled Things/Deep Down Things, and Wiseblood Books. During her residency, Angela is revising her first novel The Spectre of a Rose, a retelling of the Persephone myth, and completing work on a personal essay about getting her first tattoo.

Natasha Harrison uses glass as a medium to express feelings about fear, fragility and intensity present within relationships. She is also the Executive Director of the Norman Bird Sanctuary in Paradise Valley, Middletown, Rhode Island. 

Amanda Hawkins holds a MA in theological studies from Regent College in Vancouver, Canada. Her poetry can be found in Tin House, Poets.orgThe Missouri Review, Crab Orchard Review, Flyway, Ruminate, and Orion. She has received scholarship and awards from the Napa Valley Writers’ Conference,  Ruminate, Flyway, Arkana, and BellinghamReview. She teaches writing in Northern California and advises the undergraduate-run literary journal, Metonym. Read some of her work on this page of The Academy of American Poets.

Veteran journalist Pamela K. Johnson is Digital Content Editor for the National Writers Union. As a freelancer, her work often focuses on health. As an author, she co-wrote Santa & Pete, a novel based on a legend that Santa had a partner. It was adapted into a CBS-TV movie starring James Earl Jones and Hume Cronyn. Pamela co-edited Tenderheaded: A Comb Bending Collection of Hair Stories. The book became the basis of a stage play. She was a grand prize winner in the International 'Write Beijing' Competition, where she received $10,000 to shoot her short film “Morning Song” on location in Beijing, China. 

April- June 2018

Kim Fay is the author of the historical novel, The Map of Lost Memories, an Edgar Award finalist for Best First Novel by an American Author, and the food memoir Communion: A Culinary Journey Through Vietnam, a Gourmand World Cookbook Award winner. She created and served as the series editor for the "To Asia With Love" guidebooks, and has been the Hotel Editor for the travel, food and lifestyle website, Gayot.com, since 2003. In addition, she regularly reviews crime fiction in translation and works by Los Angeles authors for the Los Angeles Review of Books. After living in Viet Nam for four years, she currently resides in Los Angeles where she is working on a novel about women in Vietnam from the 1930s to the 1980s, as well as a mystery series set in L.A. in the 1970s.

January-March 2018

Joan Bien: is a general assignment reporter for print and online publications. She has been self-employed as a writer for seven years. Although she can write about most topics, from medical issues to 3D printers to politics, her strength is in health and mental health. Having had 250+ articles published, she has written about a wide selection of subjects. She says, "It is all about the challenge of informing readers in plain English about important issues."

Anita Cabrera is San Francisco-based teacher and editor whose short stories, creative nonfiction and poetry examine the themes of family, addiction, and redemption. Her work has appeared in The Berkeley Poetry Review, The Berkeley Fiction Review, Colere, Brain, Child Magazine, Acentos Review, Squaw Valley Review, and RavensPerch. Her story, That Thing, written while Cabrera was a writer-in-residence at the Ragdale Foundation, was selected as winner of The New Guard’s 2017 Machigonne Fiction Contest. She is grateful to her family who supports her need to disappear at irregular intervals to write.

Kayla Allen’s writing has appeared in The Yale Review, The Best Women’s Travel Writing, The Christian Science Monitor and Purple Fiction, among other anthologies.  She’s also a PEN USA Emerging Voices fellow.  She’s nearing completion of her novel, Rapture Dummy, a fictional account of her years as a child evangelist ventriloquist in Louisiana.  She lives in California with her husband and three children, and she’s obsessed with jazz accordion

Windy Lynn Harris is the author of Writing & Selling Short Stories & Personal Essays: The Essential Guide to Getting Your Work Published (Writer’s Digest Books). She’s a prolific writer, a trusted mentor, and a frequent speaker at literary events. Her long list of short stories and personal essays have been published in literary, trade, and women’s magazines across the U.S. and Canada in places like The Literary Review, The Sunlight Press, and Literary Mama, among many other journals. Her articles for writers can be found at The Review Review, the 2018 Novel & Short Story Writer’s Market (Writer’s Digest Books), the 2018 Children’s Writer’s and Illustrator’s Market (Writer’s Digest Books), and many industry blogs.

January-March 2018 Continued (Under Construction)

Catherine Keefe is a poet, essayist and former journalist. She’s the Founding Editor of dirtcakes, a literary journal dedicated to exploring themes suggested by the UN Millennium Development goals to end extreme poverty. Catherine’s poetry and essays have recently appeared in Gettysburg Review, Lunch Ticket, TAB: The Journal of Poetry and Poetics, Pirene’s Fountain, Los Angeles Times Magazine, Zocalo Public Square, and Time. She’s been anthologized in Forgotten Women: A Tribute in Poetry, (Grayson Press); Best of the 30/30 Project, (Tupelo Press), and Imagine This! An ArtPrize Anthology, (CWG).Catherine’s essay “Ka Qua Craft,” co-written with Traci Brimhall, was recently nominated for a Pushcart Prize and her short story, Delivery Day won the John Fowles Center Award. 

Elissa Lieberman is a San Diego Based painter and owner of the San Diego Art Loft, a teaching studio in San Diego. Elissa received her M.F.A from the Maryland Institute College of Art in 2002. She taught painting, drawing, and design at many colleges and universities as well as local studios and ateliers. Elissa managed the Art School for the San Diego Museum of Art in 2007/2008. Elissa opened the San Diego Art loft in 2015. A solo project, it was nominated in the top 5 art schools in San Diego by San Diego City Beat Magazine. Elissa’s paintings and drawings are loosely autobiographical. Her writing practice informs contemporary narratives and portraiture that offer her a subject matter that connects deeply with viewers. 

Optimism One’s essays have been published by In Fact Books and The Normal School, among others. He earned his MFA in Creative Nonfiction from Sierra Nevada College and teaches writing full-time at Modesto Junior College in California. He’s currently working on a memoir called Goodbye, Suicide.

RESIDENTS: 2018

Photo Credit: Trina Wood

Linda Saslow - Writer; Visual Artist
Samuel Stackhouse - Writer
Wicki Van De Veer - Writer; Visual Artist
Jackie Clarke - Screenwriter
Sheryl Stradling - Writer
Sami Lange-Visual Artist
Alan Kiel - Screenwriter 
Michael Fink - Musician
Maureen Mchugh-Writer
Robin Mullery - Visual Artist
Sharon O'Brien - Visual Artist

Angela Morales - Writer 

Writing in the interstices between cultural studies, memoir, and environmental history, Lesley Stern expands the ways we see multispecies worlds. She has published three books, and hundreds of articles. Her dreamlike work The Smoking Book (1999) has been described as “an innovative, hybrid form of writing . . . at once intensely personal and kaleidoscopically international.”

Lauren M. McKeever has been writing professionally for decades. With more than 300 published articles to her credit, the focus of her writing today is to help protect irreplaceable natural resources and vulnerable aspects of our culture.  Based in the northern Rockies, she’s written on Native American’s struggling to preserve their native language, and the threat to the existence of American ranches and cowboy culture.  Her work has appeared in The Christian Science Monitor, The Salt Lake Tribune, Newsweek and many other publications. Her writing was included in the anthology, Wyoming Fence Lines. She's working on her first book of essays about life in the still wild American West.

 

Heather King is an essayist, memoirist, blogger and former lawyer. Raised on the coast of New Hampshire she struggled for many years, got sober in 1987, and converted to Catholicism in 1996. She has written and recorded several slice-of-life commentaries for National Public Radio and is the author of numerous essays[3] and three memoirs. She lives in Los Angeles and contributes to the Catholic magazine Magnificat and the Catholic portal of Patheos and her column "The Crux" appears in Angeles. One of her essays in Magnificat, "The Sacred Heart of Jesus", received Honorable Mention in 2014 from the Catholic Press Association. She is the author of the books Parched, a memoir, Redeemed, and Shirt of Flame.

Bruce Trinkley taught composition and orchestration and conducted the Penn State Glee Club from 1970 to 2006, and was music director for Penn State's Centre Stage from 1970 until 1995. He received degrees in composition from Columbia University where he studied with Otto Luening, Jack Beeson and Charles Wuorinen. Professor Trinkley's music has been performed in the United States, Europe, Australia, South America and China

Recent works include The Last Voyage of Captain Meriwether Lewis, a cantata for men's voices; One Life: The Rachel Carson Project, a multi-media work for women’s chorus, soloists, and instrumental ensemble; and York: the Voice of Freedom, a music drama about the life of the only African American on the Lewis and Clark Expedition. His operas for young people include The Prairie Dog That Met the President and Chicken Little.

Thea Gavin is a native of Orange, CA, where she never gets tired of shoelessly exploring--and writing about--the local coastal sage scrub and chaparral communities. She recently retired from twenty years of teaching creative writing at Concordia University Irvine to have more time to wander and write. She has led summer creative writing workshops for the Grand Canyon Association Field Institute since 2014. Her poems and essays have appeared in numerous literary journals (Rattle, The Formalist, The Evansville Review, GRAPHfeeties) as well as in a variety of anthologies including Going Down Grand: Poems from the Canyon; On Foot: Grand Canyon Backpacking Stories; New Poets of the American West; and Manifest West: Eccentricities of Geography. Via her blog, Barefoot Wandering and Writing, Thea hopes to inspire others to appreciate their own local wild lands--with or without shoes. 

Kala Pierson is a composer and sound artist. Vivid, expressive, and full of bold colors, her music has been performed in more than 30 countries on six continents, widely awarded and commissioned, and published by Universal Edition. Her music's "seductive textures and angular harmonies" (Washington Post) build into "massive chords throwing out a wall of sound, like a modern-day Gabrieli" (San Francisco Classical Voice), and her focus on setting documentary and culturally resonant texts leads to works of "marvellous political power" (Louis Andriessen). She's held season-long composer residencies with American Opera Projects, Tribeca Performing Arts Center, Lower Manhattan Cultural Council, and San Francisco Choral Artists. Her other residencies include Yaddo, MacDowell, Hambidge, I-Park, and the Britten-Pears Foundation. She lives in Philadelphia with her spouses and son. 

Cynthia Weiner lives in NYC, where she's the Assistant Director of The Writers Studio. Her stories have appeared in Ploughshares, The Sun, and Open City, among others, and she is the recipient of a Pushcart Prize. She's currently working on a novel.

Laura Villareal is from a small town in Texas with more cows than people. She earned her MFA from Rutgers University-Newark. Her writing has appeared or is forthcoming in Apogee, The Boiler, Breakwater Review, Reservoir, Cosmonauts Avenue, and others. She has received fellowships and scholarships from VONA/ Voices, Key West Literary Seminar, and The Highlights Foundation.

Nancy Campana is a visual designer and writer. She founded Campana Design in 1996 and has produced award-winning designs for over 20 years. Her clients range from nationally-known book publishers and destination cities to innovative start-ups. Nancy’s writing consists of poetry, short stories, a memoir (Waiting for My Eyes to Adjust) and a novel (Scavo), all in the process of completion. She is also the creator of a story-telling product that she plans to launch in spring 2018. Nancy attended Chico State University and CCA in Visual Arts.

A native of the Washington, D.C. area, D. Gause currently resides in Las Vegas. Performer, composer, educator, writer, consultant, advocate, grant writer, coach are some words to describe her 
daily work. In her spare time, she reads, cooks, bakes, and volunteers.

“I am a sphere, not a slice.” ~D.G.

Jennifer Vandever is an author and screenwriter living in Los Angeles where she teaches at Emerson College.  She is the author of the novels THE BRONTE PROJECT and AMERICAN TANGO and was the co-screenwriter and associate producer of the film JUST ONE TIME.  Her work has appeared in First City, Redbook, The New York Times and The Village Voice.

 

Anna Leahy is the author of the nonfiction book Tumor and the poetry collections Aperture and Constituents of Matter and the co-author of Generation Space: A Love Story, Conversing with Cancer, and What We Talk about When We Talk about Creative Writing.Her essays have appeared at The Atlantic, Pop Sugar, The Southern Review, The Pinch, and elsewhere and won the top awards from Ninth Letter and Dogwood in 2016. She directs the MFA program at Chapman University, where she edits the international journal TAB and curates the Tabula Poetica reading series. 

Amy Loftus is passionate about hosting her podcast "Something Better" and creating music for film and television. Originally from Chicago, she did improv at the legendary Second City.  She has  seven albums on iTunes and toured solo while living in Nashville. Now she sings while cooking or driving her kids to Lacrosse, but is still known to go play a show because it is her absolute happy place. In somewhat stolen moments, she's been working on a novel and is looking forward to being able to focus on it completely at Dorland.

Julia Mary Gibson grew up by the magical lakes of the North American Midwest, or occupied Anishinaabe territory, where her novel COPPER MAGIC takes place.  She writes about the ways that human civilization intersects with mysterious wild nature and the sacred responsibilities we have to each other and to the planet.  Dorland has been an instrumental element in manifesting her work.  She lives in Hollywood, California, surrounded by her extended family of poets, thespians, dancers, illustrators, filmworkers, and urban farmers.